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WATCH: Mo Mandel Kills It On Conan

Here’s some advice:

Watch Rooftop fave Mo Mandel kill it on last week’s Conan:

 

Then check out some mo’ funny Mo on his Rooftop page!

rooftopcomedy.com/momandel

You won’t regret it! I promise.

-Not Jono

Watch Dan Soder Perform on Conan

New York comedian Dan Soder performed on Conan last night and was full of advice. What sort of wisdom was he dishing? Well, let’s just say if you are a child of a single parent or a New Yorker who wants to know how to avoid getting mugged, you need to watch. Dan is rising fast in the comedy world and we totally have his back. Great job Dan!

Jon Dore and Rory Scovel Mixed Things Up on Conan

Comedians Jon Dore and Rory Scovel are building a reputation of bringing a little “something extra” to their Conan appearances. Last year, Jon and Rory walked out onstage, claiming that Conan‘s producers double booked them, and simultaneously performed their sets. Yesterday, the guys returned to the show together, delivering a hilarious and bizarre performance that you just have to watch.

United We Stand with Tommy Johnagin’s No Nanny-Banging Policy

New dad Tommy Johnagin performed on  Conan last night. Like many new parents, Tommy is learning on the fly and has some hilarious fatherly insights to share with the world. Whether you’re wondering how to break the baby news to your friends or you’re looking for the best nanny possible, Tommy has it down pat. Tommy also tweeted an adorable photo of his newborn daughter backstage. Watch Tommy’s full set after the jump and be sure to follow him @TommyJohnagin.

 

Watch Carmen Lynch Make a Terrific Letterman Debut

Carmen Lynch, one of our favorite NYC-based comics, performed on Letterman on Friday night. It was her first time on the program and she was awesome. The former Last Comic Standing finalist enjoyed several applause breaks as she talked about her bedroom secrets, fear of mice, and more. Watch her full set after the jump and be sure to follow Carmen @lynchcarmen

Paul Morrissey Interview

We’re very excited to release the latest album from Paul MorrisseyPaul Morrissey‘s Back. After finishing his college basketball career and falling just shy of the NBA draft, Paul went westward to California to pursue a career as a sports news anchor. While sports has always been a passion of Paul’s, he also greatly enjoyed injecting his broadcasts with healthy doses of comedic commentary. This launched Paul on his stand-up path and he’s been busy ever since, performing several times on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, Comedy Central’s Open Mic Fight, and Comics Unleashed. We recently chatted with Paul while he was performing in Montreal, getting his take on political comedy, making his act personal, producing a good-quality TV set and more.

Rooftop Comedy: The Just For Laughs Festival is obviously a huge draw for comedy in Montreal. As someone who regularly headlines clubs there, how are the crowds during the rest of the year?

Paul Morrissey: It’s kind of funny. I’ve never done the festival, but I’ve been performing here for six years. Whenever they want to do a showcase for Montreal that’s like five minutes. I do an hour here every eight months. There’s definitely some nuances you have to know. I don’t really talk about politics or religion too much. There are a lot of differences, especially in the political arena up here. So I usually don’t end up talking to that. Most of my stuff is observational and personal experiences and stuff. You just have to find a way to make a connection and I find I do that pretty well up here.

RC: Are you talking about French-Canadian politics in particular or are you inclined to stay away from politics altogether?

PM: It’s not even staying away from it. I feel like my strength is my personal, observational stuff. There are some guys that just talk about, “Hey, what about coffee?” They keep it kind of impersonal. I think the best way to speak about something like that is—and I have nothing against doing simple subjects. I love doing common subjects and then making it my own. You know what I mean? “This one time I got coffee, you gotta hear about this.” So you make that funny. I think that’s the way I make that extra step and I find that with people, it doesn’t really matter where they’re from, if you’re telling them a personal story, they usually connect a little bit better than if you just speak about a subject. And politics—I have no desire to speak about that. I know that everyone has an opinion so it just seems like a minefield to go through. When people agree with you, I’m sure it’s like preaching to the choir. And if people disagree, I’m sure it’s an absolute nightmare. So it’s not something I even have to deal with, luckily. One of my other favorite comedy cities is Washington D.C., because I find it has very smart crowds and it’s not connected to show business at all.

RC: It can be refreshing as an audience member to not hear another bad Mitt Romney joke.

PM: The guys who do it really well—there are some bad political comics as well—but there are guys who do it great, like Jimmy Dore and guys like that. When some of those guys talk about it, it just makes me depressed. I’m like, “Oh you’re completely right, but now I’m sad.”

RC: You’ve enjoyed several appearances on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson. What has that experience been like for you as a comic?

PM: Well, obviously, for me, that’s always been one of the goals of doing stand-up. I felt my material was kind of really perfectly suited for TV. That wasn’t something I went out to try. When I first started doing stand-up, I just wanted to be funny in the club. Then the more I did material, people were like, “You have some really well-written, cleaner jokes,” and that’s really my strength. I always found that when there were nights where you had to be cleaner, I always ended up having the best sets. It just seemed that my comedy kind of developed toward that end. If there was a contest or a five-minute thing, because that’s basically what you have to do on TV—you have five minutes. I got to work with a lot of those guys who are really good at doing those five-minute spots. I toured with Jim Gaffigan for a long time and Tom Papa. Both of those guys work on the cleaner side. It’s not that they’re against swearing, but if you’re talking about food or if you’re talking about certain things you don’t need to swear or say “F*ck” in the middle. [Jerry] Seinfeld is kind of famous for saying that swearing is like cheating. It’s lazy. I still have dirty jokes in my act, but there are some jokes—let’s say for the TV appearance—I had to make it cleaner and I would maybe use the thesaurus a little bit. It’s a challenge that I enjoy. A five-minute TV spot is like writing a hit song almost. You want it to be funny and unique but you still want it to be relatable. The first thing you find out is if you try to write one of those things, it never works out. So you have to use the best material that’s best suited for the show. If you watch the shows, you’ll see on Letterman where they’re shorter, stronger jokes. Whereas some other TV spots, you can do longer stories. There are all kinds of different ways to attack it. So that first appearance, I think I showcased two times and literally, I think this was when Louis CK was filming a movie. He was supposed to be on the show and then something happened and that spot opened up and I got called and that’s how I got my first appearance. I got called the day before or something like that. That first appearance—I think at that point I had been doing comedy for seven or eight years. The funny thing is that as soon as you’re done doing it, I felt like I went pretty well. I wasn’t that nervous, surprisingly, because it was a TV studio and I used to be a TV sports anchor.

RC: Was it tricky adjusting your delivery and timing from a club setting to a television studio audience?

PM: With Gaffigan, like his Hot Pocket joke, he’s probably got 30 punchlines and so for Letterman, he uses the best four. That’s the thing: when you’re in a club, you can tell a joke and you can tag it or say “Hey, look at that guy’s shirt.” On TV, you’ve got to stay within those restrictions. The jokes have to stand on their own, basically. When you’re going through your set, you’ve got to know “Hey, this is a strong TV joke. This is a perfect TV joke.” And you can feel that. Even if I do a joke in a club that doesn’t necessarily do incredible in the clubs, but I know it’s just an original, strong, short TV joke. I don’t write towards that. Sometimes, it just happens. There are times when I really enjoy just playing around. I love doing the clubs because you can play around and say a lot of things and then I know what I got to trim down when I’m making a TV set.

RC: You used to be a sports news anchor. Do you have any interest in getting into the sports-comedy world?

PM: It was a weird thing because when I got into comedy, it was all the stuff I couldn’t do while I was working as a TV sports anchor. I basically lost my job because I thought I was being funny, but it was just at the expense of the viewers. I was doing Daily Show stories on a real news station. And this was in 1999 or 2000, so it was almost like the beginning stages of The Daily Show. So when I started doing stand-up, I just got as far away from that as possible. I think there’s definitely some room for that. You can develop some stuff and just have fun with it, instead of just analyzing it from a serious standpoint. You’ve got to be able to have fun with it. I think it’s still missing. They’ve been trying to do a really good comedy sports show for a while and I think Norm MacDonald’s probably was the one that came closest to it. I think they only gave him six episodes. I think that would be a fun thing to do, a fun thing to get involved in.

RC: Why did you choose to include light heckling and crowd interaction on your album?

PM: I think the fun kind of stuff, especially for people who listen to a lot of comedy, is the spontaneous stuff. It’s a live show, so the audience is a lot more a part of the show than the comedian would like. I guess if you listen to Ray Romano at Carnegie Hall, you’re listening to all these jokes in the ideal circumstance. And that’s almost like watching someone on a Letterman appearance. This is the perfect surroundings. I wouldn’t put out a CD where the jokes aren’t going well and people are yelling the whole time, but, in the average show, there’s going to be a little bit of that in everything. There’s going to be two idiots in the back who everyone hates and you tell them to shut the hell up and then you get an applause break. Those are all those skills you get when you start and you’re doing all these shows in bars and in laundromats. People would rather do everything but watch a comedy show, but now all that stuff seems really easy.

RC: You also keep the audience interaction pretty light-hearted and funny, rather than showboating how  you can take down someone who’s being obnoxious.

PM: Yeah, even when I’m at a show now, and somebody’s talking, I wish somebody would tell them to shut the hell up. Anybody who knows me knows that I’m a pretty happy-go-lucky dude. But everybody has their moment where they’re like “Alright. Enough’s enough.” It can feel a lot like you’re a substitute teacher but after doing comedy for so long, you figure out the right way to say “Shut up.” I don’t have to insult their mother or anything like that but it’s distracting the show and I thought that was an interesting peek into what you deal with in a live comedy show. I guess I didn’t want it to be the perfect perfect circumstances. I wanted it to be a unique kind of recording, you know?

Paul Morrissey’s Back is now available on iTunes, Amazon, and the Rooftop Comedy shop. You can also stream Paul’s latest album through Pandora, Spotify, Rdio, and other services. Be sure to follow Paul Morrissey @PaulMorrissey 

Sean O’Connor Learned Everything in Life at Magic Camp

Comedian Sean O’Connor is a source of wisdom. He knows the benefits of quitting karate, the best recreational uses of Adderall, the keys to a solid screenplay, and more. Sean performed on Conan last night, sharing these bits of wisdom along with some reflections on his time at magic camp. Watch his full set after the jump and be sure to follow Sean @seanoconnz. Great job Sean!

Comedian Jamie Lee Loves Her Sketcher Shape-Ups & Jewish-Texan Heritage

Jamie Lee is awfully proud of her roots–both Texan and Jewish. With a little help from her Sketcher Shape-Ups, they’ve helped mold (dare we say “shape”?) the funny person she is today. Jamie stopped by Conan last night to do a funny little set for you to enjoy. We’ve got the video after the jump. Give it a watch!

Tig Notaro Recaps Her Intense Year and Announces an Album on “Conan”

As comedy enthusiasts have known for a while, it’s been one heck of a year for Tig Notaro. Last night, she stopped by Conan for an interview and a full recap on everything going on in the world of Tig. After battling some serious health issues (including pneumonia and breast cancer), going through a tough break-up, and losing her mother, Tig powered through to give a hugely-acclaimed show at The Largo in Hollywood. Louis CK was so impressed with the show, he is working with Tig to release the audio version of the performance through his own websiteLive (as in “to live”), will be available for $5 starting October 5. You can watch Tig’s full chat with Conan and Andy Richter below.

Nikki Glaser Bonds with Her Mom Over Pregnancy Scares on “Conan”

Nikki Glaser has a rich, strong bond with her mother. Like any good mother, Nikki’s mom expects regular phone calls and teaches her about the dangers of cigarettes. Well, not exactly. We’ll hand it over to Nikki, who did a terrific stand-up set on Conan last night. You can catch more of Nikki’s comedy on her Rooftop profile and be sure to follow her on @NikkiGlaser.